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Viagra May Benefit Rhinos, Too

There may be an unexpected side benefit to the impotence wonder drug Viagra. In addition to helping millions of men overcome impotence, the drug may help increase wildlife.

Rhinos' horns, gall bladders from black bears, and eggs from endangered sea turtles are all used by varying groups as treatments for sexual dysfunction. And endangered species have become the victims of poachers trying to capitalize on these old wives' tales.

Bizarre as it may sound, Viagra may be a weapon in the worldwide war on poachers. Popping a Viagra instead of swallowing a sea turtle egg may ultimately reduce the market for these animals, says wildlife expert Todd Steiner. And Steiner say not to underestimate the tiny pill's impact, as worldwide demand for Viagra is enormous.

The impact on wildlife aside, at the National Urologists Convention in San Diego this week, doctors continue to marvel at the drug's impact on the human species.

"I don't think anyone would have predicted that three months after the approval of this drug, we would have a name—Viagra—that was part of the American culture," says Dr. Harin Padma-Nathan, a urologist.

Rarely has a convention of urologists become national news, but rarely has there been a drug like Viagra, with a success rate of up to 80 percent.

A new study by Padma-Nathan, to be released this week at the convention, reconfirmed the safety of the drug in the wake of six deaths reported among the one million men taking it.

"The headline is, in a very scientific, rigorous study, that Viagra is not only effective in treating a broad range of erectile dysfunction, or impotence, but is also very safe," he says.

Urologists still warn that Viagra only works for impotent men and does nothing for men with normal sexual function. They say: It's not going to change men's behavior. It's not going to liberate men like the birth control pill liberated women in the 1960's.

But for those men who need it, Viagra has quickly become the wonder drug of the '90s.

For CBS News Correspondent Jerry Bowen's complete report, click above.

Reported by CBS News Correspondent Jerry Bowen